Wednesday, October 5, 2011

Are You a Stamp Collecting, Bible Reading Maytag Customer?


I recently purchased a new Maytag dishwasher from the best furniture and appliances store that I am distantly related to, Schenck Furniture in Germantown. So yes, for the record I am 1/8 Schenck.

While you finish snickering about that I want to tell you about the super invasive and scary warranty card that came with my Maytag model MDB6709AWW2. The first thing you notice is that it is dual-language in French. This is interesting, I realized later, because I thought both Europeans and Canadians were crazy about corporations invading personal privacy.


After asking normal warranty-card-appropriate things like name, address, store, date of purchase, the Maytag card moves on to asking everything but my cholesterol level. Apparently, in order to let me know of any recalls or issues with my dishwasher, Maytag needs to know:
  • Our occupations
  • Household income
  • Level of education
  • The names of credit cards I use regularly
  • Whether I own or rent my home
  • If I am a stamp collector
  • Do I read the Bible
  • Have I vacationed on a cruise ship
  • Do I care about wildlife or environmental issues
  • If I go fishing or hunting or just like to shoot
  • My interest level in health foods
There is no indication on the card that this additional information is optional, however, there is some fine print. Let me summarize it here: We have cashed in on our good brand name to get you to give us a lot of valuable information for free, which we will immediately sell to the highest bidder and keep all the moolah. Actual sentence on the form: Please check here if, for some reason, you prefer not to participate in this opportunity.

Oh, I'm sorry Maytag. It was an opportunity for me. How ungrateful can I be?

Is it possible the Maytag repairman got so bored, he decided to do a little spam marketing on the side?

1 comment:

  1. Hello! great your blog. I just say that Here's an educator of religion, Hector Avalos, telling the world that his scholarly claim to fame is going bankrupt. Particularly, the field of "biblical archaic exploration" is quick finding that it isn't a science in light of the fact that the Bible is no manual for the past. It is writing, not history. He calls attention to that the specialists in the field openly concede this among themselves however paint an alternate picture when they converse with people in general in light of the fact that they would prefer not to "surprise" religious individuals..Thanks All!!>>>> Lucy <<<<

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